8 Face Mist Sprays That Can Help Hydrate Skin

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A face mist spray hydrates dry, irritated skin throughout the day. Here's what to look for, plus the best picks to refresh your skin.

What is face mist spray?

It’s no secret that there’s an incredible number of facial skin care products to choose from, which can make for an overwhelming shopping experience.

One of the latest trends is face mist sprays.

According to Patricia Farris, MD, a board-certified dermatologist at Sanova Dermatology in Metairie, Louisiana, these are water-based sprays that contain a variety of ingredients and can be a great option for refreshing, cooling, or moisturizing your skin.

Depending on the ingredients they contain, face mist sprays can provide a moisturizing boost for those with dry skin, help keep acne away in those with oily complexions, or simply give the skin a hydration boost for those who want it.

Here’s what experts recommend and what they say to watch out for.

When should you use a face mist spray?

According to Dr. Farris, you can use a face mist spray at any time of day, and they can be a great option when traveling to keep your skin hydrated.

She doesn’t recommend replacing serums or other skin care products that are working well for you with a facial mist but instead suggests they be used for an additional application during the day.

“Face mists have been around for a long time and are wonderful tools but not necessarily an essential part of a skin care regimen,” adds Deidre Hooper, MD, a board-certified dermatologist at Audubon Dermatology in New Orleans. “But it’s a great tool to add active ingredients and refresh your skin midday or in the evening by hydrating it.”

Face mist spray benefits

Face mist sprays primarily serve to add a boost of moisture and provide relief from dry skin, Dr. Farris says.

There are also face mist sprays available for oily skin types with the purpose of preventing or minimizing breakouts, Dr. Hooper adds.

“But mainly, you should think of a face mist as a way to deliver moisture to your skin and it would give it a temporary plumped up appearance due to the hydration,” she says. “If you’re using it as part of your daily skin care routine and using it as a moisturizer, I would use it morning and night, as your last step.”

The best face mist spray ingredients

According to Dr. Hooper, a face mist spray is just a way to deliver skin care ingredients to your skin in a really light liquid way rather than using a gel or a cream, which can be a pro in the summer because of how light they are.

“Ask yourself what’s the goal—you’re looking to hydrate your skin, you should be looking for ingredients such as hyaluronic acid or glycerin,” she says. “You should never use straight water if you’re looking to hydrate your skin because it can evaporate and dry it out.”

If you do prefer to refresh your face with just water, Dr. Hooper recommends layering it underneath a moisturizer to promote hydration.

On the other side, a face mist spray containing salicylic acid could be beneficial if you have oily skin or have acne because it allows you to avoid touching your face during application, Dr. Hooper says. You could use it alone, or layer it with a hydrating mist if you have sensitive skin.

“Skin protectors like antioxidants and even sunscreen can also be applied to the skin in a facial mist,” adds Dr. Farris.

The ingredients to avoid

According to Dr. Farris, if you are prone to skin allergies, it might be smart to avoid mists with botanical oils such as rosemary, mint, lavender, and rose, as these can trigger allergic reactions.

However, if you don’t have any sensitivities, these ingredients can add a bonus aromatherapy experience, she says.

Dr. Hooper echoed that sentiment about essential oils and fragrances, noting to always test products on the back of your arm before using them on your face.

Some face mists can also contain drying ingredients like alcohol, which you should be wary of, unless you have very oily skin, she says.

“If you have sensitive skin, try to also avoid complex and too many ingredients, especially essential oils because they can cause you to break out,” she says. “Additionally, if you’re using a face mist that stings your skin, you should immediately stop using it.”

The best face mist sprays

A facial mist can be a nice addition to your skin care routine, as long as you’re mindful about what ingredients best serve your skin type.

“It’s a luxury add-on to keep your fingers off your skin, so it’s a nice way to add hydration without touching your face, which is especially important in this Covid era,” Dr. Hooper says.

These are the top face mist sprays to boost dry, dull-looking skin.

Laroche Posay Mistvia amazon.comLa Roche-Posay Thermal Spring Water

$18

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This spray from La Roche-Posay is a great option for sensitive skin, as it soothes and protects with natural antioxidants like selenium.

It’s also oil and paraben-free, which can help with preventing breakouts.


Avene Mistvia amazon.comEau Thermale Avene Thermal Spring Water

$8

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This spray from Eau Thermale Avene can be a good option for those with normal or sensitive skin types.

It’s hypoallergenic and works to soothe and soften the skin. It’s good for those dealing with redness and irritation related to psoriasis, eczema, and rosacea.


Olay Mistvia amazon.comOlay Mist Ultimate Hydration Essence

$10

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This spray from Olay can be a great go-to if dry skin is your issue, as it works to hydrate your skin.

It also offers soothing ingredients like chamomile, aloe, and vitamin B3, which works to brighten the skin.


Neutrogena Ultra Sheervia amazon.comNeutrogena Ultra Sheer Face Mist

$13

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If you’re on the hunt for face mist spray that’s a lightweight moisturizer, this one from Neutrogena is a great option.

As an added bonus, it has SPF 55 to protect your face from the sun’s harmful rays.


Caudalie Parisvia amazon.comCaudalie Beauty Elixir

$49

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This versatile spray from Caudalie is a great option for oily, dry, combination, and normal skin types.

It features inviting ingredients like citrus and flower water. It does contain alcohol, however, so it might not be the best for sensitive skin types.


Clear Paulas Mistvia amazon.comPaula’s Choice CLEAR Back and Body Spray

$25

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If you have acne, this Paula’s Choice spray could be the way to go, as it contains the all-important salicylic acid to keep breakouts under control.

The spray can be used all over the body, which is good if you experience breakouts on other places than just your face.


Ilia Blue Light Mistvia amazon.comILIA Blue Light Mist

$18

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If you’re looking for a facial mist that hydrates your face and sets your makeup, ILIA’s blue light mist delivers.

You can spray deliberately before or after your makeup, or bare-faced throughout the day for a skin refresh. The mist has a natural lavender scent that can help calm and relax the skin.

However, if you’re sensitive to scents, before use, do a skin test and spray a little on your wrist to see if you develop any skin reaction.

Also, this mist contains blue light protection for those concerned about the effects of blue light on skin (hyperpigmentation, redness, inflammation, etc.).


Mario Badescuvia amazon.comMario Badescu Facial Spray with Aloe, Herbs, and Rosewater

$12

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This spray from Mario Badescu is tailored toward those with combination skin.

It offers an aromatherapy-type experience with ingredients like aloe, herbs, and rosewater to help soothe tight and dry skin.

It’s also multi-purposeful as you can use it to set your makeup or spray on dry hair.

Sources
  • Patricia Farris, MD, a board-certified dermatologist at Sanova Dermatology in Metairie, Louisiana
  • Deidre Hooper, MD, a board-certified dermatologist at Audubon Dermatology in New Orleans

Emilia Benton
Emilia Benton is a Houston, TX-based freelance writer and editor whose work has appeared in Runner's World, Women's Health, Self and Pop Sugar, among other publications. An avid runner, she has finished eight marathons and a couple dozen half marathons. She also enjoys country music, baking, and traveling.